crisisnotes

          Practical Suggestions for Living Through a Challenging Experience

 

by Mark D. Lerner, Ph.D.

 

A loss. A serious illness or injury. A relationship or work-related crisis....

 

During a challenging experience, it’s hard to concentrate. But what if you had a “tool box” that could ease your emotional pain, keep you functioning and lessen the likelihood of ongoing suffering?

 

In this publication, Dr. Mark Lerner offers notes—practical suggestions that will guide you from the beginning of your crisis, through the healing process. Crisisnotes offers timely information, inspiration and hope.  

It’s OK Not To Be OK®

          During a Challenging Life Experience

 

by Mark D. Lerner, Ph.D.

 

Have you faced a particularly challenging experience—a loss, an illness or injury, divorce, military invbolvement, a relationship or work-related problem, a financial crisis...?

 

In three audio sessions, Dr. Mark Lerner will teach you what you need to know. In session one, he provides practical information that will help you understand what’s happening to you now— so you can regain a sense of control. In session two, he offers strategies that will ease your pain, keep you functioning and lessen the likelihood of ongoing emotional suffering. In session three, Dr. Lerner will help you to survive and thrive.

It’s OK Not To Be OK, During a Crisis

 

Many books aim to help us in the aftermath of a crisis. This book is unique—it can help you now ... while you’re living through a challenging experience.

 

During a crisis, there’s always a rush to address our physical needs—but what about our emotional needs? What can be done to ease our hurt, keep us functioning and lessen the likelihood of ongoing suffering?

 

It’s OK Not To Be OK, During a Crisis will empower you to move from victim to survivor and, ultimately, thriver. It offers timely information, inspiration and hope.

Publications by Dr. Mark Lerner

 

It’s OK Not To Be OK... Right Now

          How to Live Through a Traumatic Experience

 

Keep a traumatic life experience from becoming your life. This publication offers practical strategies that will ease your pain, keep you functioning, and lessen the likelihood of ongoing emotional suffering.

 

This FIRST EDITION, © 2006, is available onlne through Amazon. 

Comprehensive Acute Traumatic Stress Management 

Mark D. Lerner, Ph.D. and Ray Shelton, Ph.D.

Acute Traumatic Stress Management offers “practical tools” for addressing the wide spectrum of traumatic experiences—from mild to the most severe. It is a goal-directed process delivered within the framework of a facilitative or helping attitudinal climate. ATSM aims to “jump-start” an individual’s coping and problem-solving abilities. It seeks to stabilize acute symptoms of traumatic stress and stimulate healthy, adaptive functioning. Finally, ATSM may increase the likelihood of an individual pursuing mental health intervention, if need be, in the future.

ATSM offers techniques for connecting with particularly challenging, emotionally distraught, individuals. It helps us to help others when time is limited and to know what to say when we are at a loss for words. It helps us while intervening with diverse populations such as children, sexual assault victims, potentially violent and substance-involved individuals, as well as depressed and potentially suicidal people. It provides a strategy to support grieving individuals and offers an application to address serious injury/death notification. Finally, ATSM addresses our own responses during a crisis.

Comprehensive Acute Traumatic Stress Management (CATSM) reflects the expansion of the ATSM model by addressing the emergent psychological needs of individuals, groups and organizations before, during and after a traumatic event. CATSM is a Traumatic Stress Response Protocol for all people who endeavor to help others during times of crisis. By reaching people early, we can keep individuals and organizations functioning, and mitigate long-term emotional suffering.

 

 

A Practical Guide for University Crisis Response 

Mark D. Lerner, Ph.D., Joseph S. Volpe, Ph.D., Brad Lindel, Ph.D.

A Practical Guide for University Crisis Response provides a structure and process for effectively managing the wide spectrum of university-based crises - from the seemingly mundane to the most severe. It is an invaluable resource in preparation for, and during, actual crisis situations and serves as a meaningful standard for our nation’s colleges and universities. This guide recognizes that crisis response cannot be delegated solely to administrators and members of the Crisis Response Team. Effective crisis management is the responsibility of all university personnel.

This publication introduces and incorporates a practical and effective strategy for addressing the emotional needs of people during traumatic events, Acute Traumatic Stress Management (ATSM). ATSM does not require caregivers to be mental health practitioners. Rather, ATSM can empower all university personnel by providing a "road map" to keep people functioning and mitigate long-term emotional suffering.

 

 

A Practical Guide for Crisis Response in Our Schools 

 

Mark D. Lerner, Ph.D., Joseph S. Volpe, Ph.D., Brad Lindel, Ph.D.

School crisis response can no longer be delegated solely to members of a School Crisis Response Team. Today, crisis management is the responsibility of all educators. This dramatically expanded publication provides a structure and process for effectively managing the wide spectrum of school-based crises. It is an invaluable resource in preparation for, and during, actual crisis situations and continues to serve as a meaningful standard for our nation's schools.

A Practical Guide for Crisis Response in Our Schools conveys critical information to assist schools in responding effectively to “everyday crises” as well as school-based disasters. It is an invaluable resource for administrators, support personnel and faculty. By reaching our school families early with a comprehensive Crisis Response Plan, we can potentially prevent the acute difficulties of today from becoming the chronic problems of tomorrow.